Home | About | Donate

Warning US Could Face 'Darkest Winter in Modern History,' Ousted Whistleblower Demands Science-Based Pandemic Response

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/05/13/warning-us-could-face-darkest-winter-modern-history-ousted-whistleblower-demands

2 Likes

There is a really old saying that fits the Trump Pandemic perfectly. So here it is and I hope I have it right.

For want of a nail a shoe was lost , for want of a shoe the horse was lost, for want of a horse the man was lost, for want of a man the war was lost, for want of the war a nation was lost------ and all for want of a nail!
I think that’s what Dr, Bright was trying to make PERFECTLY CLEAR. There is a war going on with this virus -----and if it wins, WE ALL are lost. : (

5 Likes

‘There is a war going on’

True
and this C-19 virus is a kissinger fast war.

Dr. Bright should have used an editor.
Writing “I and other experts” gets him a demerit in Peoria.
Maybe the old wet elbow macaroni and cheese for school lunch,
with the excellent burnt crust should be served to him for 4 days
in a row.

Hi oldie:
I think it would be all right if he put a comma between, “I’ , and other, experts…” : )
I have never been to Peoria, but that city is mentioned, I think , in the old movie HARVEY. : )

Mitt Romney, God bless his little heart, actually made a very good point telling off Orangeman’s testing czar in the hearing yesterday. His Pestilency has armies of statisticians scrabbling to find anything good to say about our response, or at least to tamp down the damn stats. Romney was not impressed, observing that South Korea has orders of magnitude fewer deaths, because they didn’t procrastinate the way USA did. With tests, it’s always the sooner the better (duh!) This principle makes “per capita” comparisons of testing more or less useless: losing the all-important metric of soon-enough testing.

Theoretically, a more useful ratio for comparing national (or state) responses is reported tests over reported cases (rather than the whole population). If testing is out in front of hospital visits, then this ratio will stay high. If testing only follows from hospital visits, it may never catch up. Every once in a while a hunch of mine works out, and this ratio does indeed look like a fairly objective view of the relative state of testing (while keeping in mind uneven reporting).

There are only 91 countries of the world with more than 1,000 reported cases, which also report test-counts. (China, for reasons unknown to me, is the only large country which does not report test-counts.) Among such countries, USA ranks 74th in testing (waaay down there), just ahead of our partners in demographic-experimentation Netherlands and Sweden. France’s level of testing is also discouraging at less than two-thirds of the global average.

At the top of the chart where they think it might be worth the trouble to keep an eye out for SARS2, Hong Kong and New Zealand show how it’s done.

COVID-19 stats for Wednesday, May 13, 5:00 PM
Countries with > 1,000 cases, sorted by the ratio: tests/cases.

>      STATE                    MORTALITY     CASES   DEATHS  PER-CASE    TESTS
>                              PER 100,000                    FATALITY  PER-CASE
>   1. Hong Kong                    0.05      1,051        4    0.38%    160.12 
>   2. New Zealand                  0.43      1,497       21    1.40%    135.63 
>   3. Lithuania                    1.98      1,505       54    3.59%    133.07 
>   4. Australia                    0.38      6,980       98    1.40%    129.53 
>   5. Uzbekistan                   0.03      2,612       11    0.42%    124.43 
>   6. Thailand                     0.08      3,017       56    1.86%     94.80 
>   7. Slovakia                     0.49      1,469       27    1.84%     86.48 
>   8. Kazakhstan                   0.17      5,417       32    0.59%     81.13 
>   9. Azerbaijan                   0.34      2,758       35    1.27%     75.61 
>  10. United Arab Emirates         2.08     20,386      206    1.01%     73.58 
>  11. South Korea                  0.51     10,962      259    2.36%     63.48 
>  12. Kyrgyzstan                   0.18      1,044       12    1.15%     56.98 
>  13. El Salvador                  0.31      1,037       20    1.93%     45.16 
>  14. Iraq                         0.29      3,032      115    3.79%     45.07 
>  15. Slovenia                     4.95      1,463      103    7.04%     44.90 
>  16. Greece                       1.49      2,760      155    5.62%     40.59 
>  17. Cuba                         0.70      1,810       79    4.37%     40.40 
>  18. Malaysia                     0.34      6,779      111    1.64%     39.25 
>  19. Czechia                      2.69      8,240      288    3.50%     38.64 
>  20. Estonia                      4.60      1,751       61    3.48%     37.75 
>  21. Hungary                      4.45      3,341      430   12.87%     35.47 
>  22. Bahrain                      0.59      5,816       10    0.17%     34.90 
>  23. Tunisia                      0.38      1,032       45    4.36%     32.83 
>  24. Denmark                      9.20     10,677      533    4.99%     32.38 
>  25. South Africa                 0.37     12,074      219    1.81%     32.00 
>  26. Poland                       2.27     17,204      861    5.00%     30.70 
>  27. Iceland                      2.93      1,802       10    0.56%     30.56 
>  28. Ghana                        0.08      5,408       24    0.44%     30.41 
>  29. Bulgaria                     1.38      2,069       96    4.64%     29.05 
>  30. Israel                       3.05     16,548      264    1.59%     28.83 
>  31. Norway                       4.22      8,168      229    2.80%     25.57 
>  32. Russia                       1.52    242,271    2,212    0.91%     24.68 
>  33. India                        0.18     78,055    2,551    3.27%     23.76 
>  34. Croatia                      2.29      2,213       94    4.25%     22.02 
>  35. Finland                      5.13      6,054      284    4.69%     21.99 
>  36. Austria                      6.93     15,997      624    3.90%     21.02 
>  37. Kuwait                       1.92     11,028       82    0.74%     20.58 
>  38. Bosnia & Herzegovina         3.66      2,181      120    5.50%     20.35 
>  39. Portugal                    11.52     28,132    1,175    4.18%     20.13 
>  40. Germany                      9.38    174,098    7,859    4.51%     18.08 
>  41. Romania                      5.38     16,002    1,036    6.47%     17.36 
>  42. Philippines                  0.70     11,618      772    6.64%     16.24 
>  43. Canada                      14.15     72,654    5,342    7.35%     15.77 
>  44. Serbia                       2.54     10,295      222    2.16%     15.21 
>  45. Luxembourg                  16.45      3,904      103    2.64%     14.78 
>  46. Japan                        0.52     15,968      657    4.11%     14.01 
>  47. Argentina                    0.71      6,563      321    4.89%     13.79 
>  48. Colombia                     0.97     12,272      493    4.02%     13.51 
>  49. Djibouti                     0.30      1,268        3    0.24%     12.95 
>  50. Oman                         0.33      4,019       17    0.42%     12.44 
>  51. Italy                       51.45    222,104   31,106   14.01%     12.32 
>  52. Ukraine                      1.00     16,425      439    2.67%     11.71 
>  53. Senegal                      0.12      2,105       21    1.00%     11.69 
>  54. North Macedonia              4.56      1,694       95    5.61%     11.65 
>  55. Belarus                      1.54     25,825      146    0.56%     11.48 
>  56. Morocco                      0.51      6,512      188    2.89%     11.40 
>  57. Belgium                     76.30     53,981    8,843   16.38%     11.21 
>  58. Saudi Arabia                 0.78     44,830      273    0.61%     11.09 
>  59. Ireland                     30.32     23,401    1,497    6.40%     11.06 
>  60. Indonesia                    0.38     15,438    1,028    6.66%     10.96 
>  61. Switzerland                 21.61     30,413    1,870    6.15%     10.59 
>  62. Spain                       57.97    236,899   27,104   11.44%     10.42 
>  63. Turkey                       4.69    143,114    3,952    2.76%     10.30 
>  64. Singapore                    0.36     25,346       21    0.08%      9.62 
>  65. Armenia                      1.62      3,718       48    1.29%      9.35 
>  66. Chile                        1.81     34,381      346    1.01%      9.13 
>  67. United Kingdom              48.88    229,705   33,186   14.45%      9.12 
>  68. Pakistan                     0.34     35,298      761    2.16%      9.00 
>  69. Egypt                        0.54     10,431      556    5.33%      8.63 
>  70. Bangladesh                   0.16     17,822      269    1.51%      8.11 
>  71. Cote d'Ivoire                0.09      1,912       24    1.25%      7.98 
>  72. France                      41.48    178,184   27,074   15.19%      7.77 
>  73. Peru                         6.58     76,306    2,169    2.84%      7.25 
>  74. United States               25.50  1,411,814   84,405    5.98%      7.04 
>  75. Netherlands                 32.46     43,211    5,562   12.87%      6.38 
>  76. Sweden                      34.26     27,909    3,460   12.40%      6.36 
>  77. Nigeria                      0.08      4,787      158    3.30%      5.94 
>  78. Guatemala                    0.15      1,199       27    2.25%      5.84 
>  79. Iran                         8.08    112,725    6,783    6.02%      5.58 
>  80. Qatar                        0.49     26,539       14    0.05%      5.24 
>  81. Dominican Republic           3.77     11,196      409    3.65%      5.16 
>  82. Panama                       5.84      8,783      252    2.87%      5.07 
>  83. Mayotte                      5.13      1,143       14    1.23%      4.20 
>  84. Brazil                       6.12    186,791   13,010    6.96%      3.94 
>  85. Moldova                      4.59      5,406      185    3.42%      3.78 
>  86. Mexico                       3.04     38,324    3,926   10.24%      3.71 
>  87. Afghanistan                  0.34      5,226      132    2.53%      3.58 
>  88. Ecuador                     13.23     31,881    2,334    7.32%      2.73 
>  89. Honduras                     1.22      2,080      121    5.82%      2.72 
>  90. Bolivia                      1.10      2,964      128    4.32%      2.59 
>  91. Algeria                      1.19      6,253      522    8.35%      1.04 
> 
>      WORLD                        3.81  4,376,724  297,016    6.79%     11.94

The beauty of Peoria, Illinois is the folks are considerate, pleasant, educated, courteous.
Just like being in Ontario !!

30 or 40 years ago, it was a city where new products were tested for customer acceptance or rejection. With Caterpillar moving to Arizona over the next few years, this town will join the
fly-over, rust belt crowd.

The c-19 will accelerate Illinois decline into 6th world status. We fell below third rate about four years ago by not paying our state bond interest.

Wisconsin’s winter may be worse than other states after today’s Supreme Court overturning Gov. Ever’s stay at home policy, opening up the state to go where ever you want, when you want. I hope all the idiots snuggle up to their favorite bar and sneeze all over one another.

1 Like

While you were writing.
Under another Wisconsin law, local authorities MAY ENFORCE any emergency measures needed. The supreme court there is a genuine disappointment. The mayor of Madison says she
is imposing rules of distance and masks, as examples. 73 years ago, Wisc and Minn traded being #2 to Iowa for having the best educated peoples. Wha happen derr??

Dr. Bright will be dissed by el trumpo tomorrow afternoon as a ‘former aggrieved employee’.

2 Likes

What happened here is that the 2010 census allowed republicans to gerrymander districts so that they retain majorities even when we elect a democrat governor.
Thank goodness for the county provision that allows some counties to stay locked down.
How smart are we? When we rarely leave the property and go to a store at least half the people are unprotected. I assume these are Fox Noise watchers.

Just south of you.
36% unmasked and 64% masked last week, May 6th, about 1 hour viewing. N= 100 at a big box store

good news: all ages, families, even super criminals, macho 312 neck tattoos.

The week before it was 50/50 with younger peoples not masked.

I’m giving a benefit of the doubt until the outcome is proven out. It doesn’t look good, but who’s an expert.
My dad asked once, do you believe in fate. I said I wasn’t sure. He said, “Fate might be a real thing, but you don’t walk out in front of a bus.”

ILL.?

I beg your pardon? His words seemed clear and well chosen to me.

I think his prose is just fine.

“If we fail to develop a national coordinated response, based in science, I fear the pandemic will get far worse and be prolonged, causing unprecedented illness and fatalities.”

Sounds like chaos, which is precisely why Trump desires that outcome.

1 Like

Somehow Universal Healthcare did not make to his list. No matter what is done if healthcare is unaffordable people will avoid treatment until the last possible moment making all other measures to stop this less and less effective.

1 Like

Right. It has been made abundantly clear that the democrat party has absolutely no intention of giving Universal Healthcare to us. What have we now, five relief bills and not one time have the dems put forth the proposal of universal healthcare. Clearly, it’s the dems who control the House, so if we can’t get Pelosi to give us a bill with healthcare as the major component, we can see who the immediate enemy is. They should propose it and then force the republicans in the senate oppose it, which should draw the ire of the US population. But their donors forbid it.

3 Likes

My unplanned trip to Peoria. Before leaving Washington state I swapped out the tired 292 y-block in my 55 ford CV for a 289 a friend gave me. In the process they left out one bolt from tranny to engine. I left for Portland to hook up with Interstate 80. Somewhere in between the tranny acted up and I couldn’t get out of second gear. I pulled into the next little town just before dusk and saw a transmission sign and pulled in. They were about to close but hoisted the car, discovered the problem, (ran out of tranny fluid), said there was no damage, buttoned it back up all within an hour. I only had gas money to get back to Wisconsin and he sent me on my way, no charge.
Somewhere down the road the alternator gave out and I called home for some money to replace it. On the road again, this is in January 1971, I ran into black ice in Nebraska I think. Been on white cross for a couple of days now and the trees along side of the road were turning into groping demons reaching for my car. Then the cherry on top. I missed my cut-off point and ended up in Peoria.
I thought about Peoria, the Smothers Bothers, and found my way home.
My first comment today, forgive me for getting off topic.

2 Likes

all of the tragic DC and media propaganda this week.
Off topic is a welcome relief.
Sanity scarce and scary
Going back to work, be wary
Outdoors best for airy
Improving at the dairy?

“He ain’t heavy, father, he’s my brother”

Hi Oldie:
Oh I am sad. I read recently what has happened to Youngstown too. The scheming vultures come in and the elected ones of the city send the $ out, ( along with their take of the money ------and so dies the towns and cities along with the Hope. : (

I wonder how much our federal elected ones made by shipping good paying work out of their own country? Detroit, once Motor City,became a city of the poor. : (

1 Like

Hi Hector:
The punctuation is a way to make the meaning more clear…that’s what is great about commas. : )