Home | About | Donate

Wary of Trump and Taiwan, 'Vigilant' China Flexes Military Might


#1

Wary of Trump and Taiwan, 'Vigilant' China Flexes Military Might

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

Fears that President-elect Donald Trump's questioning of the "one China" policy and recent phone conversation with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-Wen would amplify military tensions with China were seemingly confirmed on Thursday after an editorial in the government mouthpiece, The Global Times, called for "use of force" to deter Taiwanese independence.


#2

Dear nuclear war Trump card holding Trump Neo Leftists,

Trump had confrontation with China, including military, published as policy position for months and months.

What? There was never a risk of a nuclear confrontation with China? Would Russia join Tump USA Inc in a military confrontation, or China. Answer, China.

I would get a refund now on that Trump anti-Nuclear War Insurance Policy you bought into.


#3

Obama's doing a great job of escalating tensions with Russia, Trump with China.

It's like we have two belligerent presidents at the same time.


#4

We've now had unabashed oligarch's oligarchs in the WH and cabinets for half a century. I wonder about presumptive grooves of predatory capital having been scoring deep ruts in the fabric of life. Systemic impoverishment of entire populations has been driving young men and women into the military because the system offers no prospects for a life of dignity, much less "pride".


#5

One lousy aircraft carrier and a few ships hardly constitute “military might” (Thailand had one long before China and India probably has two or more). The Chinese military’s strength lies in its missile technology which started during the late 1950s. This is one area no one knew too much about, neither Chinese citizens nor, perhaps, even Xi Jin-ping. It was thought that they'd focused more on medium-range rather than long-range missiles, but that’s all conjecture. Also interesting is their hypersonic missiles which the US had tested (in fact the US started earlier but apparently had not the same number of successes like China’s). This is the one weapon that can reach all parts of the world about 10X the speed of sound. One can assume that any conflict between the two countries would not be limited to the China seas, but worldwide (for the Chinese, only one small foreign base in Africa but for the US hundreds of them on almost all continents). As tempers rise, it’s likely that after the first few hours nuclear warheads would be launched and neither country can remain unscathed, though China would naturally see much more destruction. But, possibly, even a dozen hydrogen bombs over the US would render much of this nation uninhabitable, not to mention its neighbors. And Chinese development would go back at least 60 years, that is, back to the time when it couldn’t even make a good rifle.

Not good prospects for either nation, but Russia, and possibly the UK, France, and perhaps India would be the new military and economic superpowers (India has the best prospects because of its size and huge population). Maybe these “new” nations would learn from the coming war and behave better towards one another. If so, a US-China war might be an acceptable price to pay.


#6

There is no way China is going to link Taiwan with trade policy. Trump is all about leverage. His advisors should tell him to forget about this and move on. If China invades Taiwan I don't think the US will come to Taiwan's defense. If Trump has any sense he would drop this. Unfortunately he has yet to demonstrate any sense. Perhaps he should go back to trying to make Mexico pay for his wall which they of course won't. That would probably do less harm then messing around in the Far East where is in way over his head. In fact being president is way over his head. He should have stayed in his comfort zone running is business in Trump Tower and let a serous person be the next president.


#7

This incident from Thursday. The Chinese seem to have a very inflated view of their maritime territorial claims. Claims to Taiwan as a "renegade province" are far more realistic.


#8

It would really help this discussion were people to look up the "pivot to Asia" policy of the last 8 years. A good place to start may be with John Pilger's The Coming War on China (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DM2utDwxpyI).

It is not like this means Trump is doing anything right (nor do I expect anyone to derive such an impression from Pilger's work). However, it is inaccurate and unreasonable to imagine that the Chinese are particularly having problems with Trump's foolishness and not with American policies that have continued over time.


#9

Dueling penises.


#10

I'm 21 minutes into your link (the Pilger film) - I had to stop there, for now anyway.

Actually, I already know all about this, as I almost went into the exploration for uranium and the like, but in my third year of university, I researched "Project Ploughshare", and promptly went into the oil business instead.

Now climate change threatens us all - a demonstration of the Law of Unintended Consequences - and I do believe this Law is a solid as can be in this ever evolving Universe.

What struck me seeing the first minutes of the film was this.

The United States, from its very inception, has never deviated even slightly from empire and inequality. The book by the Canadian savant Ronald Wright, "What is America", is as clear a revisionist history as it is possible to imagine, and destroys utterly any thought that the "equality" so highly thought to be part of America is, or ever was - real. ("Democracy in America", Alexis de Touqueville).

Where does that leave us ?

I am a scientist by training, and an explorer by nature and inclination - politics has never been my forte.

As a geologist, a student of the past, both historical and pre - of the solar system and beyond - of human nature - a part of nature - I can say that we have potential, both for good and evil, beyond rational comprehension.

At this moment - we are on the cusp of extinction. The natural world will soon decide if we are up to the task of living on this bright and beautiful planet, or venturing farther into the solar system, and this exploration, this nomadic, tribal impulse, is encoded in our genes - for better or for worse.

We have undoubtedly a destiny.

What that is I cannot say - nor do I believe - can anyone else.

Thank you for that link - it inspired me to write.


#13

There were those glossy travel brochures - actually more like booklets - distributed by the Taiwan government during the late 1970s/early 80s which were more detailed. The first large group of people sent there, besides the natives, arrived on Taiwan during the Sui dynasty (about 500 AD), so there were significant numbers of Han Chinese there before the Dutch who, in possibly the first East-West sea battle, were defeated by the Ming loyalist Zheng Chenggong - known to the Fujian people as Ko Xing Ya (Ya is a venerable term) - during the 17th century. The liberated island also managed to remain outside the clutches of the newly established Ching government until 1683, when Admiral Shi Lang decisively turned that last Ming stronghold into part of the Ching Empire. Since then, Taiwan’s Hans were able to do what their relatives across the straits had done for over a thousand years - taking part in Imperial Exams.


#15

BRAVO! Well said and appreciated.


#17

China practices piracy in the South China Sea. That research vessel was not far offshore of the Philippines and in the Philippine economic zone. What is the Chinese Navy doing there?

The dictator of China has been named as a "core leader" and controls around 11 Ministries including the army and police. China is quite clearly an imperialist power on the move, financially and militarily.

The USA could have had a partnership with Russia despite the former Cold War, and deliberately ruined the opportunity.


#18

France is a mere 22 miles offshore of England. Can we have it back, please?

And New Zealand's Maoris are thought to have originated in Taiwan. Now there is a nice claim for PR China.........


#19

If one appreciates history one should realise that mainland China actually belongs to Taiwan as the once-legitimate quasi- fascist Nationalist government of China fled to Formosa after the Communist insurgents and terrorists had taken over on mainland China.

It just depends on one's point of view as to who rightly owns whom during a civil war; in the case of the Chinese civil war, there is as yet no agreement as to who has won.


#20

I'm putting my hardearned money on the Mainland China, the real one, and Taiwan not so much. No hard feelings, but, $20 bucks is $20 bucks.


#21

Were I a betting man I would do the same. PRC has the bigger guns in trade and in arms.


#22

No, Putin would almost certainly join his bosom-buddies Trump and Tillerson in a nuclear conflagration with China - the number of humans vaporized and withered away with radiation sickness would be far greater, although fewer of us USAns would find ourselves within a 10 mile radius or downwind of ground zero, and far more Chinese would perish in our place. But hey; "life is cheap to orientals" as they used to say in the Vietnam days.


#23

Exactly!

How many here (in the USA) are old enough to remember (or remember even if they are old enough - they don't call it the United Sates of Amnesia for nothing) that the US regarded the little island of Taiwan and its great military leader Chang Kai Shek as exclusively the "legitimate" China - until Nixon (of all people) went there in 1972.

And didn't "Formosa" once belong to you imperialist Brits?


#24

I think we Brits were wise enough not to bother with the place; as we were with Vietnam (we left it to the French). Japan took it off China in 1894 and left it in 1945. Hong Kong was perfectly adequate for our imperial designs and besides, it was on the mainland.