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'Watershed Moment for Privacy' as Apple Refuses FBI Order to Create iPhone Backdoor


#1


#2

This is a supreme court case. Time to settle this once and for all. On the technical side, I am surprised the FBI can't clone the phone preserving the data safely on another device so that even if they destroy the data, they can just keep re-cloning it until they brute force the password.


#3

First, i don't see why the FBI needs Apple to do this. Seems like it's something that skilled developers could do regardless of who they work for, even the FBI.

Second, I'm shocked they haven't found a way into this phone yet. Leads me to believe this guy was using advanced encryption beyond that of which Apple supplies by default but I'm not savvy enough to know these things let alone understand them.

Third, I'm impressed that Apple is taking a stand. Such a horrible corporation in so many ways... I guess they figure this might hurt their bottom line more than employees throwing themselves of a factory roof or exporting all their manufacturing jobs and telling the president "these jobs are never coming back.

Is anyone here savvy enough to tell me how another operating system will solve this access problem? Can I phones handle a dual boot situation?


#4

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#5

When the Hatriot Occupy Refuge gang already posted their standoff on FaceBook, does the government need more? Leviathan is hungry, as usual.


#6

Why would they work with a hacker when they have access to the original maker of the product? That makes no sense. Apple is under court order to open the phone.


#7

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#8

I can imagine that they would get in faster without the public knowing if they hired in house or used a nefarious sub contractor.


#10

Yes I am savvy enough to know that Microsoft and the gates foundation are just as bad... I wouldn't consider that savvy though. At this point anyone that doesn't know that is intentionally sticking their head in the sand.


#11

Kudos to Apple for standing-up to Big-Brother - so far at least. Since the depraved killers are dead and the info gained by the FBI could be gotten other ways probably, this demand is likely all BS deception designed to get the keys to everything - "fill-in the missing 5 minute time-line" - rubbish!
As destructive and evil as killers like those two are, alphabet "security" agencies are arguably more insidious and greater threats to national and personal freedoms.


#12

Apple doesn't have much choice. This could be bad for business. That being said we all know they'll comply with the ultimate order. What impact will that have on sales? I hope they tank. At least some good will come of this.


#13

I am not supporting TPP, et al, for any reason but it did occur to me that, well, here is one, perhaps the only, instance where TPP's and TTIP's Investor-State-Dispute mechanism could actually be able to come out on the side of the people and force the US to cough up beaucoup bucks for Apple's lost profits if they didn't back off. That might stop them.


#15

Brilliant marketing strategy. This will probably go to the supreme court which could take years during which Apple can claim to be the most secure appliance.


#16

I'm sure the alphabets don't rely on stock operating systems and encryption in their devices.


#17

Meanwhile they've probably handed over the keys or "laid off" some of their best developers. Just temporarily till business picks up.


#19

Upon further reflection, I don't believe the FBI can't get the password without Apple's assistance. I think they are using this high profile case as a foundation for an Eric Snowden push back campaign. The FBI has been very vocal in their objections to Apple's new no-backdoor policies and this case is tailor made for claiming Apple is preventing them from doing their job. But they have the phone, they can clone it so that they have a back up of the data no matter what they do to the original phone. And please .. don't tell me that the Chinese or Vladmir Putin would be calling Apple for assistance if they were in the same situation with one of their encrypted phones. They'd hack in. This is about politics not technology.


#20

Saying they will not provide a backdoor is not the same as refusing to provide a backdoor while at the same time SAYING there will not be a backdoor ensures sales remain high.

Each and every day the hacker news is full of accounts of new exploits and backdoors found in US manufactured hardware, from Routers to switches, from smartphones to your smart TV and the almost immediate response from industry is to blame the Russians and Chinese.


#21

Early on in silicon valley (1980's) there was a superb encryption company, much like RSA, best encryption codes ever, Some may find the name, I don't remember.

One day when the government could no longer break their codes, they simply classified the work of the company and seized their assets. Programmers, Codes, Everything. Shut them down.
So precedence is already in place.

That being said, Apple, et al, Hold Your Ground.


#22

If they succeed in resisting the FBI, then I might buy an iPhone next. Apple should be rewarded with more business for protecting their customers from government spying. Besides, the person who owned that phone is dead so there won't be any prosecution. The data on that phone is now irrelevant and the government is exploiting a terrorist attack so they can sou on the while nation. I wonder if Edward Snowden has commented on this yet.


#23

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