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We All Did It: The Birmingham Bombing


#1

We All Did It: The Birmingham Bombing

Friday marked the 54th anniversary of the 1963 Ku Klux Klan bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church, which killed four little black girls. Martin Luther King - who just three weeks earlier had delivered his "I Have A Dream Speech" - later noted the absence of white officials at the girls' funerals and declared, "More than children were buried that day; honor and decency were also interred."


#2

This happened before my time, so just asking: Were the guilty KKK people ever indicted for this egregious crime and brought to justice?


#3

From wikipedia:
The 16th Street Baptist Church bombing was an act of white supremacist terrorism[1][2] which occurred at the African-American 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on Sunday, September 15, 1963, when four members of the Ku Klux Klan planted at least 15 sticks of dynamite attached to a timing device beneath the steps located on the east side[3] of the church.[4]

Described by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as “one of the most vicious and tragic crimes ever perpetrated against humanity”,[5] the explosion at the church killed four girls and injured 22 others.

Although the FBI had concluded in 1965 that the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing had been committed by four known Ku Klux Klansmen and segregationists—Thomas Edwin Blanton, Jr., Herman Frank Cash, Robert Edward Chambliss, and Bobby Frank Cherry[6]—no prosecutions ensued until 1977, when Robert Chambliss was tried and convicted of the first degree murder of one of the victims, 11-year-old Carol Denise McNair. Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry were each convicted of four counts of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment in 2001 and 2002 respectively,[7] whereas Herman Cash, who died in 1994, was never charged with his alleged involvement in the bombing.


#4

Appreciate your reply. Was going to look it up later. Thanks.


#5

For more about that Angela Davis has written several books on race in America. She knew the 4 little girls and her mother was a neighbor…


#6

So many tragic milestones mark this “American” experiment. In memory of these young lives lost and for a better world:


#7

A fitting memorial:


#8

I remember it well. I was almost 17, a Senior in an all-white public high school in a state next door.
That era began my lifelong love/hate relationship with my native South, and with my “race”. It is hard.


#9

Thanks.


#10

It’s not WHO is guilty but WHAT. In the early 1800s Welsh reformer Robert Owen had the wisdom to recognize that it is “external circumstances” that was the problem–and did something about it at the New Lanark mills.

Here in the U.S. “external circumstances” are responsible for the KKK, etc., but our “leaders” have always been too short-sighted to recognize that it makes far more sense to try to PREVENT problems from arising than just engaging in “mopping up” operations. This failure, in the case of global warming, is likely to “do in” our species within a matter of years!


#11

The “love of neighbor” message of Jesus has NEVER been an important part of white “Christianity.”


#12

Don’t watch this video until you have a wad of tissues nearby!


#13

Yep, along with so many other Christian commands, such as “Thou shalt not kill”.