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'We Want Change': Hundreds of Florida Students Stage Walkouts Demanding Action on Gun Violence


#1

'We Want Change': Hundreds of Florida Students Stage Walkouts Demanding Action on Gun Violence

Jake Johnson, staff writer

As busloads of students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School traveled to Florida's capital to demand stricter gun control measures in the wake of last week's deadly shooting, students from the nearby West Boca Raton High School staged a massive walkout on Thursdsay to express solidarity with their peer


#2

Great! The kids have to show the “adults” the way just like they did during the Vietnam War…


#3

One day the people will realize they actually hold the power. On that day, this country will burn.


#4

These young people are the future of the planet! I am so proud of their swift action. Speaking truth to power–so courageous! Keep it up kids!


#5

I was 17 when I attended my first Vietnam War Antiwar Movement protest.

All of my friends that joined me were the same age as I was.

Our protests were primarily on the Mall in Washington DC, and on the Campus of the University of Maryland.

All of the Antiwar protests that I attended were peaceful except for a three week period in May of 1970.

Three days before 4 Kent State students were killed by National Guardsmen, Dick Nixon announced the invasion of Cambodia by American forces and the campus at the University of Maryland expoded.

The Republican administration in DC did their best to stifle our voices with police, National Guard troops, bayoneted M-16’s, tear gas, rubber bullets, however, the students persisted.

In the media Nixon called us “Bums.”

Both of my parents, lifelong Republicans, didn’t appreciate their two sons being called names for standing up for the right to disagree with a War half a world away.

We wanted change, and it took another 5 years to get it.

I hope these kids today have better fortune than we did, however, we both went up against a Republican administration, and Big Business that deals in Death.


#6

The Vietnam protests were then, this is now and the world and rules have chsnged. Why do you think the police forces are being trained in and by Israeli forces? Expect any right to protest violently beat down in the same manner as the Palestinians are treated. This is the new existing reality. The American people no longer have the right of peaceful assembly when it involves protest against the government position. The young of today will not have the right to own or possess firearms period. So you are as free now than you will ever be in the future. The 1st and 2nd Amendments are very close to being eliminated. No free speech and no personal protection. The battle has been lost without a fight.


#7

MEXICO: Extremely restrictive gun laws (one handgun under .40 caliber only within owner’s home) and a near impoverished standard of living. much gun violence.
USA: Gun laws vary widely from state to state, a collapsing or collapsed middle class coinciding with a decades long rise in mass shootings.
CANADA: No registrations of ANY handgun or hunting rifle required ANYWHERE in the entire country, a strong social safety net bouying a relatively robust middle class. Practically no mass shooting.

QUESTION: So what is really causing the violence?


#8

This is catching on.
Yesterday, Monday, hundreds of Iowa City high school students left their schools and walked out of City High and West High, and walked to Old Main on the U of Iowa campus, and held a gun control rally there.
Local news covered it, and it was encouraging and inspiring.


#9

Guns do not CAUSE violence. But they sure enable it. Gun control will reduce violence. Look at other countries.


#10

"CANADA: No registrations of ANY handgun or hunting rifle required ANYWHERE in the entire country"
Not quite:
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/online_en-ligne/reg_enr-eng.htm


#11

May be of interest to you: http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/johann-hari/johann-hari-protest-works-just-look-at-the-proof-2119310.html


#12

Thanks for that article, MikiBitsko.


#13

Pb, mi amigo, I KNEW we were kin! (One big difference: my parents were totally in support of what we were doing.) You’re lucky you can remember all the stuff…I guess. Between the civil rights activism and the anti-war stuff and a couple of other issues, some of my memories have faded or conflated😢. But I do remember the hard work, the frustration at the lying politicians, errr, the cops, fire hoses, and tear gas, and the bonds forged amongst us kids and a few brave college profs…and the CCCO. I hope these kids keep up their head of steam and then some.

We are all so proud of these kids! There’s a song I’m trying to remember but can’t…it may have been from the Spanish Civil War (?)…the line I want is “…and a child shall lead the way.” True!


#14

Awesome article! Thx. It’s encouraging. Should be posted all over the place, especially in the kids’ school newspapers. Benjamin Spock is/was one of my heroes.


#15

Isaiah 11:6?


#16

“Walk Outs” create unity –
It’s an actual showing of what’s in your heart for the world to see.


#17

Apparently you failed too understand my post. I WAS LOOKING AT OTHER COUNTRIES, NAMELY CANADA AND MEXICO. Re-read my post.


#18

Then Quebec is in violation of the Canadian Supreme Court?
From wikipedia…
“Long gun registration is no longer required after Bill C-19 was passed and made into law. However, it was still required in Quebec until March 27, 2015, when the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the destruction of long-gun registry records was within the constitutional power of Parliament to make criminal law, denying the Quebec government’s legal challenge and allowing for those records to be destroyed.”

My point remains, as the poverty of the general population increases as it has in the USA over the past 35 years or so, mass shootings seem to rise.


#19

Answer my question please, what is causing the violence. My examples yet show that the guns are not the reason. So going after the guns is a bit like making homelessness illegal, it seems to address the problem but it does nothing to ameliorate the underlying causes.


#20

Wikipedia is not always current.

As for the rate of ‘mass shootings’ it is in the last decade that the rate has tripled, when besides growing income disparity the ease of access to military style semi-automatic weapons and ammunition has increased significantly with the 2008 Supreme Court decision. (While the ability to legislate gun-control measures has decreased.)

Although poverty and income inequality is growing in Australia for instance (http://www.acoss.org.au/poverty/), legal access to weapons used in mass shootings in the U.S. is tightly controlled.

https://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/FlagPost/2012/December/Australian_gun_laws

and this is an example of what is required to own a gun.

Addressing income inequality is most desirable but how much it alone would contribute to a decrease in ‘mass shootings’ without changes to the gun culture and lack of gun regulation is questionable.