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'We Will See Them in Court': Howls of Protest and Lawsuit Promised as Trump Takes Wolves Off Endangered Species List

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/10/29/we-will-see-them-court-howls-protest-and-lawsuit-promised-trump-takes-wolves

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Wolves have more loyalty and integrity in every bit of fur than Trump has in his entire body, including his hairpiece.

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His hairpiece is probably made from a wolf’s fur. (One of those “trophy” kills to be proud of.)

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I love woves—if only people could be more like them!
They keelp control of the deer, who nibble on young tree shoots and decimate them. But twolves are truly a species who controls overpopulation of deer—but they do the same to themselves. Not every pair breeds-----the strongest and the best do, and those who don’t breed care for the little wolves. WOlVES----wiser than humans—and certainly wiser than anyone in the Trump Administration

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What s the Dump administration going to do about the increased amount of rodents and sick animals because of his dumb wolf moves? Maybe he should go out and try to pet an unendangered wolf?

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If there was “karmic justice,” Trump would be lost in the last few acres of wilderness left in America, and the last pack of wolves would recognize him as the ultimate symbol of humanity’s destruction of Nature, and rip him to shreds.

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In Stephen King’s book, The Stand a pandemic sweeps the world, and in that book there are a number of characters that embody Trump, …let’s see who would you cast Donald Trump as.??..

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"I was young then, and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters’ paradise. But after seeing the green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view.

"Since then I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

"I now suspect that just as a deer herd Lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolfs job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dustbowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.

“We all strive for safety, prosperity, comfort, long life, and dullness. The deer strives with his supple legs, the cowman with trap and poison, the statesman with pen, the most of us with machines, votes, and dollars, but it all comes to the same thing: peace in our time. A measure of success in this is all well enough, and perhaps is a requisite to objective thinking, but too much safety seems to yield only danger in the long run. Perhaps this is behind Thoreau’s dictum: In wildness is the salvation of the world. Perhaps this is the hidden meaning in the howl of the wolf, long known among mountains, but seldom perceived among men.”

-Aldo Leopold, Thinking Like a Mountain

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My Spirit Animal! That son of a BITCH!!! That has to be stopped!!!

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We have Canadian artist Robert Bateman’s books here - one of them is titled:

“Thinking Like a Mountain”, titles and inspired by one Aldo Leopold.

When you’re in the mountains like I was - you see a lot - sometimes it is called ‘red in tooth and claw’,

but it appears only natural, and not at all horrific.

What you also encounter over and over are tourists who say they wouldn’t mind if a bear attacked them - it’s their turf.

As a mountain man - that is a form of insanity - and horrific.

The great polar explorer Fridtjof Nansen, also a Nobel Peace Prize winner when that meant something, and also a scientist by the way, said in his rectorial address to St. Andrew’s University I think - to the students in Scotland, when he was an old man:

“The first great thing is to find yourself and for that you need solitude and contemplation - at least sometimes. I can tell you deliverance will not come from the rushing noisy centers of civilization. It will come from the lonely places.”

― Fridtjof Nansen

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What ever happened to the Ayn Rand conservative survival of the fittest crap?

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Trump pet a wolf? No way! He can’t even relate to a dog, 'cause they instinctively don’t like him. First President in many decades to not have a White House dog. Well, he does have Melania…

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Trump is doing everything he can to destroy this country, its citizens, its environment and ecosystem and its wildlife. What miserable and despicable pieces of crap these MFs are.

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Good the issue will be decided in court. To bad there is not an environmental/species related court but this is an obvious misstep in avoiding extinction.

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While wolves play different roles in different parts of the country.
The reestablishment of wolves in Yellowstone is particularly interesting. More wolves has meant that a whole chain of wildlife and vegetation including trees, has come back from being endangered to thriving once again. From bears to willow trees, beaver and birds, the reintroduction has been awesome.

Just who would be dumb enough or greedy enough to see this extinction be recreated.

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that’s easy to answer: donald dunce and the repugnican party!

currently reading a great book about elephants, wolves, whales, and assorted other wild creatures, and how they have personalities, intelligence, emotions, and social/family bonds, just like us. it’s titled BEYOND WORDS, by carl safina, published 5 years ago.

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The ranchers raise cattle ‘for slaughter’ often on ‘Federal land.’ Ah, but wolves are the problem.

Meet the big bad wolf if you dare ~https://www.meat.org/

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Any business has naturally occuring problems like weather or predators. That should be part of the business plan. You lose some to the wild, but make up for it in quality. Organic farms lose plenty to insects and disease, but have mitigation methods to increase quality and thereby income. As a restauranteur, I lose plenty to inclement weather, COVID-19, traffic jams, sleazy customers etc, but that is the cost of being in business.Ranchers just want to take from our land and it’s inhabitants for their own profits.

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Ya got that right!

They are fully compensated by tax payer dollars when they lose an animal. And yet when their cattle damage federal land they often do not compensate in return for full damages. The cattle often graze for pennies on the dollar.
And we haven’t even started talking about cheap hamburgers or Amazon destruction.

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I do understand , somewhat, the opinions of ranchers who have seen their valuable animals, Calves, sheep killed by wolves and believe the wolf population must be kept to reasonable numbers.
But, as a former hunter, one now a bit long in the tooth to continue to hunt, I was raised to understand my place in nature and that of all species on the planet.
It seems that today, blood lust and a joy of killing has replaced the awareness of our role and that of the animals we hunt. Perhaps we are a cancer on this beautiful earth?

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