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We're Supposed To Be Peace Officers: Good Cop Who Stopped Brutality and Got Fired For Her Trouble Just Won Her Job Back


#1

We're Supposed To Be Peace Officers: Good Cop Who Stopped Brutality and Got Fired For Her Trouble Just Won Her Job Back

Pigs Fly Dept: Regina Tasca, an actual, humane, compassionate police officer in New Jersey - her department's only female and openly gay one - has won back her job after a judge invalidated her 2012 firing due to the scummy behavior of police officials who orchestrated it. They had declared Tasca "unfit" after she fought off fellow officers brutally beating on a disturbed young man whose family had called, improbably, for help. Many say Tasca was targeted for "crossing the blue line" of police impunity. Damn straight, she says: "I protected that kid - I did what I’m supposed to do.”


#2

She should be named the new police chief, or even the state's Public Safety Director.

But she'll probably now be squeezed out of her job in a more subtle way.


#3

I wish Officer Regina Tasca were employed by my hometown Sheriff's Office.


#5

The actions of many police over the last fifteen years or so beg the question; how many of these guys are recent ex military, and how many of them had served combat tours in the middle-east? If not that, it would seem that many departments across the US need to do a better job of psychological evaluation of their applicants.


#6

Good to see an example of a good cop.

Pity there aren't more like her.


#7

Typical fat assed bald headed thugs with guns and badges.....That is who we got to protect and serve....By the way protect and serve should really be...Cover my ass...Shoot to kill>>>>


#8

I hope she doesn't now have to face the blue wall of intimidation and harassment. Cop culture has many ways of avenging things, and with a corrupt agency like this, it is pretty much a certainty that her co-workers will make a sport of making her miserable.


#9

Ya know there is such a thing, that has been determined... called, Emotional I Q... so, do police officers have to take a test for this?... it truly does not seem so...


#11

Let us help her get stronger as her stance is right.Create a Facebook page for her and collect the world opinion about her bold and right act there!.


#12

The police departments and sheriff offices around the US do in fact perform excellent psychological testing. They require their respective recruits, or recruiting agents of the candidates that have trouble reading, to include with their resumes an LSRPS (Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale) document. Testing positive on the questionnaire is considered a employability asset. Kyle Sharp should also thank the day he was born white.


#13

"Emotional intelligence", despite Mayer & Salovey, doesn't really have anything to do with intelligence, as a term it's a misleading way to elevate the status of social perceptiveness.

According to psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen PhD, who studies the autism spectrum and developed a 50-item self-report for preliminary diagnosis, sensitivity to emotions and social cues is found more often in females than males. In his view, Asperger's syndrome could be characterised as a manifestation of "male-pattern" cognitive neurology. Me, I think he's ignoring the effect of nurturance and social learning.

Cops can be taught how to be more socially perceptive, insofar as they can be taught anything (no willingness = no learning). Social perception is basically pattern-matching against cultural norms.

But the only useful test would be a couple of hours of video with professional actors portraying increasingly subtle emotions while the prospective cop analyses the situation out loud and the tester evaluates the goodness of his/her answers. A paper-and-pencil test would be worse than useless. And the result would be a lot more women cops, since girls get socialised to be aware of emotions and boys get socialised to ignore them.


#14

BOGOTA — Regina Tasca, a terminated borough police officer who a state Superior Court judge recently ruled should have her job back, no longer
will be back with the department any time soon.

A state appeals court has invalidated the lower-court’s decision last
month that would have forced Bogota to reinstate Tasca, who was
terminated in 2012.

The Appellate Division finding, written by Judge Jose L. Fuentes and
issued Wednesday, said Superior Court Judge Rachelle Harz should not
have rendered her decision because the case was already under the
appellate court's jurisdiction.

“Once this court asserts jurisdiction over a case, the trial court does
not have the authority to grant any form of substantive relief to the
parties in the case, not even in the form or a motion for
reconsideration,” according to the appellate court’s decision.

In September, Bogota had appealed a procedural issue — whether Tasca
should have a new disciplinary hearing — to the higher court. Arguments
on that matter were heard in February, but the court had not ruled on it

http://www.northjersey.com/news/appeals-court-puts-brakes-on-reinstating-former-bogota-policewoman-pending-more-legal-action-1.1306117

yet.