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What Does Poverty Feel Like?


#1

What Does Poverty Feel Like?

Beverly Gologorsky

Imagine this: every year during the Great Recession of 2007-2009 there were nearly four million home foreclosures.


#2

“If media talk shows were ever to invite the real experts on, those who actually live in neighborhoods of need, so they could tell uswhat their daily lives are actually like, perhaps impoverishment would be understood more concretely and provoke action.”

I’d like to tie a good portion of the punditry to chairs in truly impoverished environments (using their own bootstraps, of course) to watch them crumble as their stomachs growl and their minds wander to the foie gras that they ate the night before. The smirking self-serving bastards wouldn’t last an hour before soiling themselves. The poor have more dignity than the mouthpieces for money and always will.


#3

http://www.investmentwatchblog.com/corporate-profits-are-crushing-wages-and-the-tax-cuts-arent-helping/

This article shows how the wage inequality in the USA and increasing rates of poverty, are fueled directly by Corporate tax breaks. If you look at the bottom chart comparing Wages as a percentage of GDP to Corporate profits as a percentage of GDP it quite clear that everytime Corporate profits climb , wages in fact drop.

Note as well the effects of the Vietnam war on worker wages. The peak of wages as a percent of GDP was in 1971 . After Nixon went off the Gold Standard due to the Vietnam war debt , workers real wages plummeted and outside a few spikes upwards it has been downhill since.

The root cause of poverty is not “lazy workers” or “an uneducated workforce” or “Social Program spending”. It is Government Policy which is focused on permanent warfare and tax cuts to the Corporate State. The reason the rich are getting richer is not because of “innovation” or because they “wealth creators” it because Government Policy is DESIGNED to transfer wealth to the pockets of the 1 percent.

That the very Politicans that are being elected to office either or of the 1 percent or know they will get into that club if they “play along” shows the issues are systemic and will never be addressed by those elected officials. This is “Running Government Like a Business” in a nutshell.

The Corporate model from the get go was never about “creating wealth and lifting all boats” as the right wing pundits have suggested. It has always been a model about STEALING wealth and transfering it into the pockets of one small group at the expense of everyone and everything else.


#4

Try living on 700 a month on disability and not being eligible for a food card, I can’t afford to do anything and have to do house cleaning in the house I live at because my rent payment isn’t enough. I can’t afford to own (or insure) a car, I can barely survive.


#5

Poverty sucks.


#6

A poignant and honest piece about what poverty really feels like, and the effects it has on people’s lives, instead of just sterile numbers and statistics. I was fortunate enough to grow up in a middle-class household to college-educated parents (back when a college degree almost always meant a better life), but due to various reasons, once I became an adult I spent more than a decade living in grinding poverty; I can definitely relate to this piece. To this day I never feel secure in anything, a holdover from my days of slaving at shit jobs for barely enough money to afford one meal a day and the lights on in a roach-infested studio apartment that ate up the rest of my income. Poverty really does poison the mind and spirit and heart and has lasting effects, even years or decades later when one has been fortunate enough to reach a higher rung on the income ladder.

I wish Trump and every other politician in /running for office could be forced to live in poverty for at least one year. I think it would do at least some of them a world of good.


#7

Sorry about this in the good old USA>


#8

I think it would do good also but unfortunately with their gluttonous greed , it is only a fantasy.


#9

It’s been said before, but it’s unbelievable how expensive everything is when you’re poor. I have a seriously beatup 26+ year old car (that I could barely afford to buy), that has cost me almost 2k over the last year or so. I can’t get a loan for a newer car, well maybe one at 24% interest, and had to stay home today because I couldn’t get in to work; this could get me fired. I pay about 60% of my income for housing. It seems impossible to climb out of this hole. I’ve completely lost hope.


#10

In my very early adulthood (1974) I lost my well-paying job due to a layoff from a factory supplying chrome bumpers and door handles to the Big 3 automakers. At the time, and in the state I lived in, the unemployment compensation I received was $150 a month.

As you can well understand, my wife and I with one child ran though our savings in just under a year even though I was taking any and all odd jobs I could find. As a result of not having any health insurance, my family fell into “poverty” due to our toddler’s health condition of failure to thrive. Those who say that those in poverty are there because they want to be, have never experienced poverty for themselves … an experience that causes the total loss of identity and self-worth.

This story brings an Emma Goldman quote to mind:

"Ask for work. If they don’t give you work, ask for bread. If they do not give you work or bread, then take bread.”
― Emma Goldman


#11

Curious to know what the final solution is to all of the homeless, poverty stricken, no healthcare and little hope that many people have going forward. Respect for life has turned into respect for money only. The hopes and dreams of America have died by greedy design. The fall without any effective answer back in reality.