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Where the Forest Has No Name

Where the Forest Has No Name

Paul Koberstein, Jessica Applegate

Driving up the Pacific Coast Highway from San Francisco, you approach the world’s largest contiguous temperate rainforest. But don’t look for any markers or directions. There aren’t any. In fact, the rainforest, which stretches 2,500 miles from Northern California all the way to Kodiak Island in the Gulf of Alaska – almost as far as the distance as from New York to Los Angeles – doesn’t even have an official name.

“There’s no official name in the national names database,” says Bruce Fisher, president of the Oregon Geographic Names Board.

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The Pacific Coast Forest - Occam’s Razor. The simplest answer is usually the best. In truth, another name could even be the Salmon Coast but Pacific Coast Forest is self descriptive.

Where God sits when He wants a bit of shade!

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At decade ago the coastal area of the Olympic Peninsula region of the subject “no name” forest was identified as one of the quietest places in the lower 48.

A decade later additional commercial and military air traffic has substantially increased noise with ever expanding growler flights from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (Oak Harbor WA) and military maneuvers in the forest sure to exponentially increase noise and species impacts.

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You mean She?

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I would only add “rain” before forest.

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ASK THE NATIVE NATIONS!
In Amazon grtowing and improving alliances are narrowing down the perpetrators and nation states including Brazil under fascist Bolsonaro - also covered by Mongabay:
New report examines drivers of rising Amazon deforestation on country-by-country basis

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Good point.

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When the first settlers to arrive in the state of Pennsylvania, they found a blanket of trees covering the entire state.

By 1900, the state, as a result of massive development by the coal, lumber, and steel industries, had suffered nearly 60% deforestation.

If not for many people including Rachel Carson, industry would have inflicted even more severe damage to the state and it’s people.

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I’ve been to the ‘One Square Inch’ spot a few times. The last visit was marred by one of Whidbey Island’s growlers. The naval base has already green-lighted plans to increase the number of training flights over the Peninsula. How ironic that experiencing the marvelous rain forests of Olympic National Park - which survived the lumbermen’s lust - is now under threat from the sky. As always, if every citizen saw what they own, if they could just one time walk the mossy aisles of the Hoh Rainforest, this unnecessary intrusion would have been stopped.

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Salmon Nation celebrations have been going on in the Northwest for a couple of decades ( still have my stickers and decals ). They’re a great event on a beautiful summer weekend in the Int’l Ecotopian Region in our magnificent Northern & Western Hemisphere.
" Save the planet, we may need it later. "
Circa 1994.

Where is George Lucas when you need him? If I am not mistaken “Return of the Jedi” was filmed in that neck of the woods. ( No pun intended.) Seeing those scenes made me appreciate our bounty along the western coast of the United States. These areas are truly National Treasures and once desecrated and lost…there is no going back but in filmdom. Get off your devices folks because screen time is not real time. Take a real walk in the woods without tech and see how it all relates and even sometimes calls to you. What then will be your answer?