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While US Attacks Net Neutrality, UK Makes High-Speed Internet 'Legal Right'


#1

While US Attacks Net Neutrality, UK Makes High-Speed Internet 'Legal Right'

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

Rejecting major telecom company's offer to voluntarily expand in rural regions, UK government says speedy broadband service now mandatory nationwide by 2020


#2

justa amblin 'long in backwater usa, yeah…detours aplenty on the grand ole superhighway…

(Don’t even show us Switzerland, Finland, or SKorea! Oh, the misery!!)


#3

Gotta give Ajit the Ultimatum.

High Speed Internet access as a right, or he wakes up in Russia, deep in the woods. Naked as a Jay bird, with honey smeared all over him.


#4

The notion that high speed internet access is a legal right is absurd. No one has a right to force someone else to give them internet service.


#5

Hey, Verizon is hiring and you would fit the profile of their kind of employee…unless of course, your comment is tongue-in-cheek sarcasm.


#6

Perhaps a trip to Karnataka in India to revisit his family’s roots (Kandan) to pick up garbage and clean up sewage from humans and cattle as it runs down the streets where the “untouchables” live (communing with “them” would be considered by his parents/him to be an unheard of punishment)…that would only be fitting with the sxxt he has thrown over all Americans less the top 1%, which he and his parents occupy based on their incomes and financial worth. Yet another occupant of the DJT pit of venomous vipers and swamp creatures.


#7

The US has long trailed behind Europe and the rest of the industrialized world when it comes to high speed internet and fiber optic cables. The communications giants are too busy buying each other out, colluding, price-fixing, and otherwise finding ways to make more profits to pay their shareholders and the executives more and more and more. Investments in high speed access and fiber optics are co-opted by the million$$$ and billion$$$ they leverage for the buyouts and/or mergers. No one in either France, Germany, Italy, etc. pays more than $35 (US) for any and all internet/cable services of much higher quality than that offered residentially in the US. Free anything in the US is only reserved for the wealthiest and corporations…everyone else pays through the nose.


#8

A small pittance compared to what the current Tax Scam is about to cost us, wouldn’t you say?

An educated population is the backbone of our future.

Do you feel the same about Air and Water?


#9

Anything that requires a positive obligation on someone else’s part to provide cannot be a “right”, because no one else has an obligation to provide it to you.


#10

Much of the internet was developed by the US Government so theoretically the people have a proprietary interest in the internet. There are also other infrastructure issues that are controlled by the people and thereby should be our right as a public to control. This seems to be very much like a public utility which can be regulated. It is unfortunate that local governments did not develop mechanisms to provide internet service to their citizens. That, like so much else, was given away in privatization. Yes, we have proprietary rights in the internet.


#11

Obligation:
The condition of being MORALLY (or legally) bound to do something.

Right:
That which is MORALLY correct, just, or honorable.

Guess the Brits and the rest of Europe know what is MORALLY the RIGHT thing to do. An educated, informed populace is far more productive contributing to society as a whole than leaving out hundreds of thousands of “others” without financial means to attain internet or cable (in US). Voter turnout in the US compared to any other number of nations around the world (in this case, Europe) directly reflects the rampant ignorance and apathy existing in the US today with the DJT base the most ignorant, uneducated, uninformed demographic.


#12

Looks like the UK is not going to repeat Neville Chamberlain’s mistake appeasing Hitler 80 years ago.

The first step for other nations is to not appease Trump and other US fascists.

The second step is to legislate 180 degrees from what the US is doing.


#13

Thanks, Reader for informing WWS.


#14

The US is rapidly becoming a nation where anybody without internet access is a second class citizen.

To add insult to injury the same model will soon be true of smart phones. On a recent trip down the west coast I noticed that motorists could not pay for street parking in locations in several cities without having an app that enabled payment. Ditto for some city-owned parking garages.

Having been developed with US taxpayers dollars, no investor owned company should be allowed to have any control of the internet. They all need to be publicly owned public utilities


#15

No one will be forced to “give” internet service away. ISPs will receive a fair price for the mandated service, just like other utility companies do.


#16

Poor, homelss and elderly are NOT second-class citizens. In rural areas, internet access is usually confined to one provider so the cost is ridiculous and way out of reach of these folks: $59 is lowest cost (that does not include a router or modem for Wi-FI that adds another $40/mo) for the slowest almost worthless internet access and that amount would pay for groceries or rent or utilities or public transportation for folks living on fixed or very limited income (if they even owned a computer to begin with). For them, internet access and use of a computer would be confined to going to a public library that provided same for free. Now, with the loss of net neutrality in the US thanks to the thieves in charge means even more financial burdens on those with the least struggling to just keep warm, fed, clothed and a roof over their heads.

And I whole-heartedly agree with your comment!


#17

It’s not a “someone else”, it’s a coporation; and we don’t have an obligation to charter it.


#18

How about you take a flying…


#19

You are trying to get through to a highly propagandized troll. Good luck…


#20

Not that it will get through his programming.