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Who Are We? What Do We Americans Truly Value?


#1

Who Are We? What Do We Americans Truly Value?

Marian Wright Edelman

Too much and for too long, we seem to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our Gross National Product, now is over $800 billion dollars a year... if we judge the United States of America by that... Gross National Product counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage. It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for the people who break them. It counts the destruction of the redwood and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl.


#2

Americans, as a whole, value nothing. Their existence, carefully kept in line with bread and circuses, is pretty much all they know. They can be riled to a cause with propaganda at the drop of a hat, but have no long lasting values--only slogans. They will willingly kill in the name of one who abhorred killing. Values? There is not a large enough flashlight to illuminate such within America.


#3

Had I not viewed the following (and other well-done You Tube documentaries), I would not offer as Exhibit A--the purposeful destruction of children AND childhood (and that includes a well-rounded education) by Hollywood and its elites. I encourage open-minded C.D. readers to check this out.

Truly, it is mortifying. And it shows what education--aimed at developing intelligent, fair-minded, moral human beings--now faces: a battle in the form of these dark, all too pervasive cultural forces:


#4

You do the Deep State and its agents of Propaganda proud by confusing citizens WITH their programming.

Also, you make the mistake preferred by most who post on C.D. (and that's why I believe such individuals to be working for PR agencies or other paid opinion shaping entities) who posit that ALL Americans conform to one singular standard.

Ridiculous.


#5

We have institutions that define themselves as democratic but have abandoned civic virtue and the common good and harnessed their power and authority to the interests of corporations. Americans have developed such a desire and preference for money that the public self-consciousness and commons has ceased to exist.


#6

Americans are arguably the least materialistic people in the world; no actual materialist—no one who had the least appreciation for actual physical matter and its sensory and sensuous qualities—could stand the vile plastic tackiness of America’s built environment and consumer economy for a fraction of a second. Americans don’t care in the least about matter; they’re happy to buy even the most ugly, uncomfortable, shoddily made and absurdly overpriced consumer products you care to imagine, so long as they’ve been convinced that having those products symbolizes some abstract quality they want, such as happiness, freedom, sexual pleasure, or what have you.

Peak Meaninglessness