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Why Do Our Schools Seem Broke?


#1

Why Do Our Schools Seem Broke?

Scott Klinger

Early this year, teachers in “red” states such as West Virginia and Oklahoma walked off the job to protest declining pay and insufficient classroom resources. Shoppers at office supply stores often run into teachers with carts full of classroom supplies that their school districts say they can’t afford. Last winter, Baltimore City had to close many of its schools for lack of heat, and again near the end of the year, for lack of air conditioning.


#2

Our gubmit is so stupid that it is getting in its own way


#3

Here in Cobb County, Atlanta, GA, our elected leaders “gave” away 400+ billion dollars in subsidies in order to entice the billionaires into building a new (and unneeded) sports stadium with the help of Mercedes Benz. The NFL, yes the NFL threatened to never bring another Super Bowl to Atlanta unless a new stadium was built. So the men got together and offered their bribes and whoa, a new stadium! There was no public vote on the giant giveaway to the private sector and the main elected official lost his reelection bid to the council. The money, will come from various sources, but the schools are the prime target. God forbid, that the kids get the money they need for education; I mean having the Super Bowl in town every 5-7 years is worth the sacrifices the kids make so their fathers can enjoy a brain-destroying sport. What a ripoff.


#4

No tyrannical government wants an educated citizenry.


#5

I hope you organize and expose this sham all over the internet as well as the papers. Who the F cares about sports especially those that are violent?


#6

But the rest of the people do.


#7

With the corruption on display in Washington and where lack of ethics and values are applauded throughout the country, it is no surprise that school systems across the country are being ripped off, too. But it’s not just salaries. It’s all the systems working poorly that beget a system that requires a teacher to work two jobs and sell plasma to pay bills. And it is also a system that continues to devalue educators by overloading them with work, stagnant and under pay, and marginal or no continuing educational support. The kick in the ass is Betsy “Deer in the Lights” DeVos. She wants to degrade the system in place without making any attempt at improvement, alas, because she comes at the subject in total ideological ignorance.


#8

While I agree with what you said I would remind you that Obama and Duncan also set education on the wrong trajectory. Neoliberal is destructive no matter the source.


#9

Because neither party gives a damn about education.


#10

I could almost forgive her if that were the case, but I believe she’s clear in her ideology—it’s the “vile maxim,” all for me and mine, and none for you or yours. Any public statements she might make are powder, paint and lipstick to cover up this fact. Public education—in truth, public ANYTHING—is anathema to this crowd, for reasons of personal gain more so than for ideology.

“Politics, n.: A strife of interests masquerading as a contest of principles.”
–Ambrose Bierce


#11

A short answer runs, “The rich and the military bleed the commons.”

Much of the population and of various faculties believes that education is training for corporate service anyway. So even while the population does believe that more money ought to go to education, they bring relatively little constructive criticism to bear as regards the failures of existing systems.

The last two waves of K-12 education reform, Republican and Democrat, have each attempted to increase the influence of capitalistic profit/loss and cost/benefit analysis to the nurture of children.

A business and capital-based analysis of education or of children at essence runs just like its assessment of anything else. The idea is to put as little money into the schools as possible, and to derive the most salesworthy commodity out of that process.

It has been part of the mythology that the wealthy have hired from post-Randian that salesworthy commodity is somehow covalent and coterminous with the well being of children, people, ecologies, intellectual vigor, free discourse, what is called “spiritual growth,” or you name it.

If we extend this to the universities, we encounter another revealing watershed. Government and business decided very consciously that there existed as of the early 1970s an “excess of democracy.” They moved to shut down self-determination by increasing debt, particularly college debt (https://archive.org/stream/TheCrisisOfDemocracy-TrilateralCommission-1975/crisis_of_democracy_djvu.txt).

That is why government and large business do not want to fund schooling. That is why they wish to hinge primary education to business-related norms. They want to train some percentage of the population to execute certain tasks for them, and they want to withhold information not directly related to that from as many people as possible.

Anyone who believes that this is altogether unintentional really should wade through the above link.


#12

Comparing people especially children is the invention of charter schools, and at least some of the public hooked on to that. It is sickening. The staff that work in these places often do not have full college degrees and might make 12 to 15 an hour.


#13

She is the dumbest on two feet, and was hired to actually demean the department of education just like Zinke was hired to degrade the department of the interior.


#14

We have had 50 years of dumbing down in America and we are number One in that area. We have the dumbest man in the WH.Ignorant and proud of it.