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Why Teacher Uprisings May Hit Blue States Too


#1

Why Teacher Uprisings May Hit Blue States Too

Jeff Bryant
Surprising results from a new survey of teachers reveal the depth of “financial strain” classroom professionals face.

#2

Love this.
Can someone please tell me what a purple state is. Thanks.


#3

A state where there is equal support for both parties of the Duopoly.

Mix Red and Blue to get Purple.


#4

Great article. I am an upstate New York state teacher and that first paragraph really hit home with me. I am struggling with everyone of the issues mentioned here. To add insult to injury, my local newspaper publishes reports painting teachers as overpayed because they tend to make a little more money than the average New Yorker. They fail to mention that we are required to attain graduate degrees saddling ourselves with $1000/month debt that will likely force us to put off retirement one day so that we can finally pay off our college loans. Of course they also fail to mention how important public education is.


#5

Thanks. Makes sense.


#6

It makes sense that the first teacher strikes should be in red states; these are generally, though not exclusively, areas of greater economic hardship.

But there has been no recent Democratic support for teachers or education. So other unions are apt to follow suit.

In “banana republics” or CIA-contrived false democracies throughout Latin America and probably elsewhere, teachers’ unions have long been a holdout group struggling for egalitarian politics and community integrity in ways that have not been true within the United States.

With most of the other unions dissolved or bribed, perhaps we are seeing something of the sort here.