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Will President Scott Walker Ask Congress for Authorization Before He Bombs Iran?


#1

Will President Scott Walker Ask Congress for Authorization Before He Bombs Iran?

Robert Naiman

People who claim that they have an alternative to the Iran nuclear deal besides war might want to check in with Wisconsin governor Scott Walker, widely judged to be one of the three "serious" Republican candidates for President.


#3

Sixteen half witted republicans running for president. Indentured students to the rich, reasonable tuition as 'more free stuff' They all want to gut S.S. and Medicare and some want never ending war. They don't believe in obvious global warming that is getting worse. They belong in an asylum not the white house. If one of them cheats or buys, no difference, their way into the white house it will be time to revolt. One of them running the country the rest of the way into the ground is unacceptable.


#5

Drones are controlled by pilots seated thousands of miles away, such as at Creech air force base in Nevada and Beale air force base in California. (see Former US military personnel urge drone pilots to walk away from controls, in theGuardian, 17 June 2015). They also use military bases in Germany, etc...

In a joint letter, the retired and former military members call on air force pilots based at Creech air force base in Nevada and Beale air force base in California to refuse to carry out their duties. They say the missions, which have become an increasingly dominant feature of US military strategy in recent years, “profoundly violate domestic and international laws”.

“At least 6,000 lives have been unjustly taken by US drone attacks in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, Iraq, the Philippines, Libya and Syria. These attacks are also undermining principles of international law and human rights,” the authors write.

Among those who signed the letter are retired US army colonel Ann Wright, who resigned in 2003 over the invasion of Iraq. She is joined by several anti-war veterans and former members of diverse ranks from the air force, army, navy and marines.

The new protest comes as the US military is facing a crisis in its armed drone program as a result of a steady decline in the numbers of trained pilots available to fly the missions. The New York Times reported on Wednesday that the air force was planning to cut the number of its daily drone flights from 65 to 60 as a result of the drain of pilots.