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With the New Year, the American Parade of Politics and Prejudice Marches On


#1

With the New Year, the American Parade of Politics and Prejudice Marches On

Michael Winship

Philadelphia, Cradle of Liberty and City of Brotherly Love, was anything but on New Year’s Day.

Visiting with family, we’d all decided to meet up at the annual Mummers’ Parade.


#3

Competing for the U.S.A 21st century Goebbel's award are Cass Sunstein and Frank Luntz.

Does Luntz understand (or care?) that this same phenomenon is what drove Hitler into power in Germany, circa l938:

"From their views on the state of the American dream (dead) and America’s role in the world (not what it used to be) to how their life is working out for them (not quite what they’d had in mind), a plurality of whites tends to view life through a veil of disappointment. When we cross-tabulate these feelings with reports of daily anger (which are higher among whites than nonwhites), we see the anger of perceived disenfranchisement — a sense that the majority has become a persecuted minority, the bitterness of a promise that didn’t pan out — rather than actual hardship."

Some very sick people seem to think that war IS the health of the state. Big Brother state, that is.


#4

We can either join in the disintegration or turn it around with love. Random acts of kindness have an incredibly powerful effect these days...I have seen people break down and weep just by having someone demonstrate simple human kindness and compassion, when they expected to be spit upon. The next time you see a homeless person sitting there looking empty, stop, look them in the eye, and initiate a conversation. Their stories will touch your heart.


#5

History shows us it can be a short trip from brown face

To brown shirt


#6

Not a bad idea to share a sandwich, either.


#7

Eh. This is all the pre-game entertainment. The revolution was cancelled. After all, who would fight whom? What the rich are now doing to the middle class is what the middle class already did to the poor. Yet, there appear to be people who actually think the poor (the real poor, not just min. wage workers) want to "stand in solidarity" to help protect the advantages of the better off alone. That's just weird.

Remember Occupy? Occupy began as an extraordinary people's movement that could have changed the course we're on. But before we had time to catch our breath, Dem pols and lib media (which have become remarkably elitist) redefined Occupy as a middle class movement alone. The rest of us walked away, and that was the end of any movement.

Democrats and liberals spent the last seven years more deeply alienating a huge chunk of the Dem voting base, -- the truly poor, and those who get why unrelieved poverty has been sinking the country -- setting the stage for a rerun of Gore vs. Bush. It seems to me that the wisest course of action would be to begin figuring out what (if anything) we will do after the elections.