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Women in Iceland Leave Work at 2:38pm to Protest Gender Wage Gap


#1

Women in Iceland Leave Work at 2:38pm to Protest Gender Wage Gap

Nika Knight, staff writer

Thousands of women across Iceland walked out of work at 2:38pm local time Monday to protest the country's wage gap, arguing that their lower wages mean they effectively work without pay after that point.


#2

A woman's work is never done

Being devalued


#3

Iceland also has a strong, comprehensive welfare system. It's a very different sort of nation/society from the US.


#4

I think these are the greatest women in the world right now. They truely stand together. By comparison Hillary went to take a board position with Walmart and did nothing to level the pay gap there nor has she ever committed to ERA. Sad that. Poor work all around including her covering for Monsanto at the Rose Law firm.


#5

I didn't think it would happen in Iceland ( women getting paid less than men) but it did.


#6

"Protesters say they are effectively working without pay in the afternoons, given the 14 percent wage gap"

And here we thought 3% gap in the US was bad.


#7

Three percent?! I think your calculator is on the blink. :slight_smile:


#8

"decades later, women in Iceland still earn 14 percent less than their male counterparts. (In the U.S., women working full-time earn 20 percent less than men.)"

That's correct--when "full-time" is defined to be 35 hours per week or more. If it is moved up to 40 hours per week or more, the U.S. earnings gap drops to 10 percent, and it drops even further if the hours are raised beyond that. But an earnings gap is not the same as a wage gap. Average earnings doesn't take into account differences in hours worked and kinds of jobs worked. Men work more hours per week on average. Men also tend to dominate in higher-paid technical fields, math, science, engineering, programming, etc. while women tend to dominate in lower-paid social service jobs. Men are also more willing to work jobs that have less flexible hours, or require travel or frequent relocation, outdoor jobs, remote location jobs, off-hour jobs, long-shift jobs, uncomfortable jobs, strenuous jobs and the most hazardous jobs. Men die in work-related accidents at ten times the rate of women (but you don't see men protesting a gender death gap). When studies do adjustments for actual hours worked, education, skill level, experience and seniority, comparing within similar jobs, each such adjustment shrinks the gap to where it is not clear that it still exists in the U.S. overall. There are certain kinds of jobs where there is a clear gender difference. Female professional basketball players will never make anywhere near what their male counterparts do, for example, but on the other hand, male fashion models will never make what their female counterparts do. But this notion that women are systematically underpaid just doesn't pass the smell test. If it were true, corporations would be looking to boost their profits by preferentially hiring the bargain gender. And even if there is some small part of the earnings difference which cannot be attributed to the hours worked and the kinds of work done, somehow it still winds up that women do nearly 2/3 of all consumer spending. And I don't expect we'll ever see anyone protesting the unfairness of that.