Home | About | Donate

World to Refugees: Go to Hell


#1

World to Refugees: Go to Hell

John Feffer

It’s a famous story, though perhaps not famous enough.

The 1939 voyage of the MS St. Louis, a German ocean liner, was recounted in a 1974 book and a 1976 film (both titled Voyage of the Damned) as well as a 1994 opera. This history is not forgotten. Yet so many unfortunate people around the world are still doomed to repeat it.


#2

At the end of the day, if not at the beginning, human refugees are but another externality to the economy of Empire. The Enlightenment must be reignited, else all life on earth shall be compromised and laid waste on the unholy altar of the unclean beast known as maximum profit.


#3

Seems to me the refugees are already in hell ,and the rest of the world is flushing in that direction


#4

You are a Poet, Wise One.

That comment was pure poetry.


#5

This piece is filled with lib/prog political dissonance:

First, it fails to accurately describe how the U.S.-led capitalist empire has created the conditions that pushed (and pushes) nearly all of the tens of millions of refugees away from their homes and homelands;

Second, while correctly describing Israel’s abuse of African refugees, it somehow ignores the many millions of Palestinian and other Mideastern refugees that the apartheid entity has created and actively suppresses.


#6

Thank you posting that up front. I add IMF, WB and that ilk are also a decade into global land grabs, monopolization of agribusiness that absolutely CANNOT be term agriculture, mining in areas of absolute necessity of being maintained in their natural state. The necessity of natural coherence as a planetary system being the penultimate externality in an I-can’t-hear-you-na-na-na-na of the psychopaths who preen and strut or grumble or strive in the delusional state of empire.


#7

Feffer’s account works on some levels, but there’s a dimension missing. In '39, Jewish Europeans were fleeing violence that was prodominantly German; today, most refugees are fleeing violence that is predominantly American.

The American president denies refugees entry on one side while he directs the violence that displaces them on the other.

This is just as true of refugees leaving Latin America for San Diego and Brownsville as it is for boats of refugees coming into ports in Spain and Italy. The only difference is that American violence in the Mideast has become more overt, while American black ops violence throughout Latin America is mostly carried out by CIA proxies and associates to stamp out other businesses, legal and illegal (the most complete accounts may be by Douglas Valentine).

Readers might be excused for getting a picture of current and recent leaders as a Roosevelt who might only need to be chided to allow the Jews whom he regards as someone else’s problem to enter. That’s a naive vision of Roosevelt, who turned these people away to die while he was angling for war. But it is a dangerous view of either party.

A closer comparison here would be to Adolf Hitler, who denied the Jews passage variously while he exterminated them. A somewhat closer comparison still is to Israel’s work to exterminate the Palestinians in areas that they wish to acquire, because of the modern sort of care given to disinformation.


#8

Trump and ICE are disappearing many of the immigrants they are arresting, where, nobody knows.

There are news articles out there of mass graves being uncovered in Texas.

Trump may have much more in common with Hitler than anyone imagines.


#9

“Go to Hell”! Sorry but these refugees are fleeing from Hell, a hell created for them by the US with UK and NATO help. Middle East refugees would still be in their countries if the US hadn’t destroyed Iraq, Libya, Syria, Yemen and is threatening to do the same to Iran. As far as South and Central American refugees, they are fleeing fascist dictators placed in power in their nations by the US and the ensuing violence.


#10

“I really don’t care do u”-----from queen Marlenia the number one immigrant in the US----I think she needs to be deported.


#11

If they are fleeing violence that is mostly American, why are they fleeing to America?


#12

Please stop with the utterly transparent attempts at distraction and diversion. They are fleeing to anywhere that they can, because they merely want a chance to live. As the article states, that includes many other countries besides America, even though America is to a great degree
responsible for the instability in their home countries.

Don’t worry, though. They don’t mean you any harm. They are just people trying to survive.


#13

America is not “to a great degree” responsible for the instability in their home countries. And the vast majority aren’t “refugees”. They are, mostly, people who are willing to take their chances to try and improve their lot in life.

Look, for example, at those on the Aquarius - the overwhelming majority are adult males from sub-Saharan Africa who are seeking better economic conditions - not “refugees” in the traditional sense.

Under international law, refugees are supposed to seek asylum in the first country the come to. For those fleeing Central America, I don’t see them stopping in Mexico. For those fleeing central Africa, I don’t see them stopping in Libya or Eqypt, or Tunisia.


#14

May be of interest as a source of information as to why they are not ‘stopping in Mexico’.


#15

I guess we will just have to fundamentally disagree on this. Whether overtly (Libya), covertly (Honduras), or economically (Mexico/NAFTA)…the USA has indeed made life more difficult and dangerous for people in many different countries, and continues to do so. Our MIC and Security State economy demand that we do. Our Agribusiness and Petrochemical industries require it as well.

We help create refugees but don’t want to take any responsibility for them, except in cases where it is politically expedient (think Cuba).


#16

Shame the article didn’t include the facts and figures for the millions of Africans in refugee camps in neighbourng countries or displaced in their own countries.

Six of the world’s 10 most neglected displacement crises are in Africa, according to the Norwegian Refugee Council.

The Democratic Republic of Congo, where decades of conflict has left more than five million people displaced, topped this year’s list of the world’s most neglected displacement crises,