Home | About | Donate

You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet: Western States Face Decades-Long Megadroughts


#1

You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet: Western States Face Decades-Long Megadroughts

Nika Knight, staff writer

"Megadroughts" that last for decades are threatening to strike already parched Western U.S. states by the end of the century, a new study finds, with one model predicting that a drought lasting about 35 years may be a "near certainty."


#2

I have an idea. Let the Corporations buy what little water remains , allow it to be polluted with fracking waste, let Industrial agriculture contaminate the rest and the loss of water to drought will not drop precipitously because there will not be any.


#4

Who owns the water?
Nestles does correct?
Capitalism at it's finest. Buy it up and sell it back at a profit. To hell with the commons.

The Colorado River starts off as a wide and fast moving waterway. As it moves south it's siphoned off little by little.
When it reaches the Mexican border the river has become no more then a trickle. Eventually it becomes a dry river bed where a mighty river once was.
Another Capitalist venture.


#5

Many small towns located in parts of California that actually have water are losing it because the corporations that own the water rights sell the water to Nestle and other companies that bottle it and sell it in the US and abroad.


#6

Shades of the Irish famine. Lots of food produced but others willing to pay a higher price so it was exported as the people starved

The peoples that slavishly repeat the meme of "the free market" have to set aside that nutcase religion.


#8

There was the pre Democratic Leadership Council (DLC) Brown and now there is the post DLC Brown.

Anybody who wanted to continue to be a Democratic Party politician after the 1985 DLC formation needed to follow the new corporate cash mantra. The new criteria became (as Dubya said) "you are either with us or against us".

Brown drank the kool-aid.


#9

Bad news for the PNW. There will soon be a megalopolis from Tacoma to the Canadian border. They are not immune,however,, despite their reputation, from the parched specter of drought.


#10

Good news: we can store several years worth of water supply in our naturally occuring underground reservoirs. Our existing water can go farther.

Bad news: Fracking companies have pumped their toxic waste into these naturally occuring reservoirs.

No more California salad bowl. As for Colorado, well, the wheat belt is a new dust bowl waiting to happen. This leaves the Russian wheat belt and the Argentina wheat belt, although those are on the chopping block too. Well, there's always seafood, er, no, those are dying too.


#11

Ah, too true re the PNW.

This time last year 100% of the state of Oregon was in "Severe Drought", with 67.29% of the state also into "Extreme Drought".

Combine that with the fact Oregon has been the number one destination for people relocating in the U.S. for the last three years, placing increased demand on all resources, especially water, and . . . well, you get the picture, the very "megalopolis" to which you allude.


#12

Jill Stein for President. You have to make the alternative universe a reality.


#13

Drought and dust bowl, a few bad words in a universe filled with badness. In Southeastern Colorado, out on the steppes, the damage from the first dust bowl are still apparent. The area is still recovering from the first one. Folks out here understand drought conditions and know how to conserve water, but what is being talked about here is a specter of evil. How interesting that the gluttony of the bourgeois will destroy the very thing they extracted their wealth from. Sounds like the goose laying the golden egg is about to become soup.


#14

Are jellyfish edible?


#15

The warming is causing so many fires that if we stopped burning fuel completely it wouldn't stop the increase in CO2. A huge sequestration effort based on growing vast quantities of biomass is possible and could be done with the carbon credit markets. In fact the richest and worst polluters would solve the problem and get even richer in the process. The talk about degree increases of 1 or 2 should just be converted to CO2 concentrations that need to be reduced back to 300 ppm. Remember Dr. Kevorkian? He used CO2 and so do the Koch brothers.


#16

And to think, when we get right down to the heart of the situation, these facts essentially guarantee Earth's hand basket to Hell journey:

  1. TPTB in the fossil fuel industry, are essentially one arm of the corporate oligarchy that controls the State.

  2. That industry is/has using the same propaganda techniques as the the tobacco industry.

  3. An enormous group of people, mostly who identify themselves as Christians, buy into this propaganda (including those employed by the State), and promote it, claiming all or at least one of the following:
    A. "I have heard other explanations for it."
    B "Global warming is a hoax--there has always been climate change."
    C."It is a hoax promoted by liberals and tree huggers."
    D. "A fair and just God would not ever destroy the world, or allow it, because I read so in a compilation of ancient writings, written by that sky god, for which there is absolutely no scientific support."
    E. "Here is a snowball, therefore global warming does not exist"

Note: I don't think too many of these folk would actually come right out and say, "The entire NASA organization and 98% of all climatologists and credible scientists and academia worldwide are simply wrong." Or do they?


#18

In Stein's universe - which is why we need to vote for that "alternate" candidate ...


#19

It isn't simply the idea of a "free market" - it is the market mentality, the market fundamentalism that occupies our minds, that permeates all aspects of our lives ...


#20

There was an article I read some time ago that I have dug up again. It shows the parallels between religion ond "free market fundamentalism"

The concluding paragraph.

There is, however, one contradiction between the religion of The Market and the traditional religions that seems to be insurmountable. All of the traditional religions teach that human beings are finite creatures and that there are limits to any earthly enterprise. A Japanese Zen master once said to his disciples as he was dying, "I have learned only one thing in life: how much is enough." He would find no niche in the chapel of The Market, for whom the First Commandment is "There is never enough." Like the proverbial shark that stops moving, The Market that stops expanding dies. That could happen. If it does, then Nietzsche will have been right after all. He will just have had the wrong God in mind.