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Your Government Has a Secret Kill List. Is that OK With You?


#1

Your Government Has a Secret Kill List. Is that OK With You?

Tom Emswiler

Bilal Abdul Kareem, an American citizen, thinks the government is trying to kill him. And he might be right.

Kareem’s story, recently chronicled in Rolling Stone, neatly captures the havoc that the war on terror has wreaked on the legal system and the dangers of abandoning legal traditions that have served us well for centuries.


#2

Just asking: With our fascist government led by our racist and fascist leader Trump; how long before the NSA and the CIA’s metadata applies to people in the US who are put on the same list as American terrorists?


#3
  1. Right to be accused of wrongdoing if it is being acted on.
  2. Right to defend yourself against charges once they are provided.
  3. Right to freedom from public stalking.
  4. Right to freedom from excessive electronic attack.Phones can send excessively high voltage thru a nearby security line circuit, causing a shock and muscle spasms.
  5. Right to freedom from public defamation of character. Reports of a terrorist in the area can come on everyone’s phone but yours. Erroneous or distorted details may be provided.
  6. Right to freedom from excessive monitoring. I covered up a camera in the corner of the air conditioner in my hotel room yesterday. As I was doing this, teenage girls outside were shouting and giggling in the hallway.

#4

Perhaps, our Well regulated Militias should have their own Secret Kill Lists.


#5

Killing an individual without arrest or trial is called MURDER.
Is this what we stand and salute?


#6

Secret kill lists are the stuff of military/fascist regimes. That’s why this country has them and uses them. No, it’s not OK with me, but, then, I don’t vote Democrat or Republican, so I’ve never given my permission for extrajudicial killings, endless war, illegal surveillance of citizens, continual erosion of my right to due process and all the evils brought to us by our corrupt two party system. But, hey, go ahead and keep voting Democrat and then wonder why the democracy you never really had appears to be vanishing.


#7

Last I checked, the constitution guarantees due process and equal protection of the law to all persons within a state’s jurisdiction, not just citizens.


#8

Actually, racial/class profiling has already made poor (especially minority) U.S. citizens targets of the domestic police state. Some (usually political activists) are on actual lists. The vast majority are murdered with impunity simply because they exist. Thousands die each year within the U.S. borders.


#9

Perhaps they do. They’re not all that “well-regulated.”


#10

Yup, if you still “stand and salute.”


#11

It is not OK with me that the government has a secret kill list. It also has an openly kill list. The openly kill list applies to the wars overseas. The secret kill list applies to the drone strikes and other methods of killing specific people in specific places. Our troops like to commit torture and murder abroad because it is not violating US laws. They don’t care if they’re violating foreign laws.


#12

This piece is ludicrous. It implies (or ignores the fact) that assassinations, kill lists and death squads are necessary parts of a National Security State. It also seems to believe that the U.S. has a functional legal system that has something to do with justice and has ever operated under a rule of law. It’s another “time to grow up kids” piece.

If Emswiler and Isenberg are serious about Congress challenging the National Security State, they would begin to ask the new crop of Democratic Congressional candidates why they avoid the issues of global empire and militarism and are afraid to challenge global capitalism head-on.


#13

This article is really good and right on.

Except it has a major flaw.

It acts, like the 4th and 5th ammendments read:

AMENDMENT IV

The right of citizens of the United States to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

AMENDMENT V

No citizens of the United States shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any citizen of the United States be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

But they don’t read that way. This is how they read:

AMENDMENT IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

AMENDMENT V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Due process and probable causes are rights guaranteed to everyone, not just US citizens. They are about limits on the US government’s power, not about privileges of citizens.

We are not at war. Any time the US government orders the killing of anyone without due process, whether they are citizens or not, it is in violation of the constitution.


#14

Excellent point!


#15

Hi LibWingofLibWing------- Amazing----- because my copy came from the 108th Congress July 18th 2006------and it agrees with what you have for the REAL amendments
PERSONS changed to citizens-----wow open season on immigrants???

This is like what happened in that book the ANIMAL FARM. The pigs kept changing the words and the poor horse who worked hard his whole life ended up at the glue factory!

We’re in Hamlet Time now… “something is rotten in the State of Denmark…”. buy hey, we can change the words like the government did and make it America instead of Denmark!
.


#16

“To be sure, the evidence against al-Awlaki is damning — that he inspired both the Fort Hood shooter and the Boston Marathon bombing…”
That is not ‘evidence’ but conjecture. There is no evidence that he was in any way connected with either incident. And none either that his 15 year old son, killed later by the same agency, was in any way connected to any ‘crime’.


#17

But it doesn’t work. Those who have tried due process for stalking and electronic harassment have been called crazy, delusional, estranged from family, institutionalized even. Going to the doctor to show damage? Most states have a list of ailments that they can treat for and doctors cannot offer assistance off that list. Electrical sensitivity is not on the list.
Got a problem with it? Stick to your symptoms. The burns, skin damage, elevated blood pressure, sore muscles, diarrhea, pain, headaches, they can treat. Call it fibromyalgia, maybe.
In one article, this was called, “slow kill”.


#18

Consider that confirmed.

Most such work within the US borders is hired out and not advertised, for various reasons that will probably be obvious on reflection.


#19

A separate point here is that the government has an “open-secret kill list,” if I may brave farce by describing it as such.

The kill list has existed, in some form, since before COINTELPRO in the late sixties and seventies. And the military and the police have killed for longer than that, with wildly varying degrees of impunity.

What became different with the murder of Anwar al-Alawki and his minor son by Barack Obama is that it was announced in advance as a sort of open secret that he was to be murdered by the state and by presidential order, likely in part to see how much public outcry there might be. And indeed, Obama was sufficiently successful in this that he continued the practice, as has Donald Trump thereafter, recently murdering al Alawki’s 8-year-old daughter.

The so-called “terrorism” that al Alawki was accused of was dissemination of opinions and political commentary. This cannot legally be construed as aiding and abetting an enemy, for example, because a legal enemy is a state against which war has been declared.


#20

There have been many lists. At the border as i was talking with a Canadian agent once. the woman said, “Which list are you referring to?”
Some are discussed on the Presidential Commission on the Study of Bioethics, 2009-2017. Included are the syphilis epidemic created on Southern black men, , the beginning of AIDS, electrical torture, and others. There are video meetings and transcripts. What appalls me most among these is the way the director of these meetings chuckles.